fotojournalismus

fotojournalismus:

Vrindavan, India | March 14, 2014

Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal (coloured powder) unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. 

(Photos by Ahmad Masood/ReutersManish Swarup/AP, Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images, Harish Tyagi/EPA)

theatlantic
theatlantic:

Hotter Weather Actually Makes Us Want to Kill Each Other

Farmers in Brazil are more likely to invade each others’ land in years that are particularly wet or unusually dry. Americans honk their horns more at other cars when it’s hot outside. Countries in the tropics are more likely to have civil wars in years that are especially hot or dry.
They may seem random, but actually, these events are all connected. New research from Princeton University and UC Berkeley published today in Science reveals a link between big shifts in climate and precipitation and a rise in interpersonal violence, institutional breakdown, and especially inter-group violence, such as war. Not only does the paper shed light on past bouts of global conflict, it also offers a warning about the future. The world is expected to warm by at least 2 degrees Celsius over the next few decades, unless governments do something drastic, and the researchers say that increased bloodshed could be a serious side-effect of that trend.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]


Something which, where I am at with its current weather, seems very relevant.

theatlantic:

Hotter Weather Actually Makes Us Want to Kill Each Other

Farmers in Brazil are more likely to invade each others’ land in years that are particularly wet or unusually dry. Americans honk their horns more at other cars when it’s hot outside. Countries in the tropics are more likely to have civil wars in years that are especially hot or dry.

They may seem random, but actually, these events are all connected. New research from Princeton University and UC Berkeley published today in Science reveals a link between big shifts in climate and precipitation and a rise in interpersonal violence, institutional breakdown, and especially inter-group violence, such as war. Not only does the paper shed light on past bouts of global conflict, it also offers a warning about the future. The world is expected to warm by at least 2 degrees Celsius over the next few decades, unless governments do something drastic, and the researchers say that increased bloodshed could be a serious side-effect of that trend.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

Something which, where I am at with its current weather, seems very relevant.